The Hidden Place

May 13, 2008

Ann Gale

Filed under: Contemporary Painters — thehiddenplace @ 9:25 am
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Ann Gales paintings of fragmented figures, painted in muted tones are strangely compelling.  The subjects emerge from a storm of little splodges and short brushstrokes, almost by accident.  Every edge is broken and indistinct, yet the form of the figure is still forcefully present.

The brushwork feels like each stroke is an independent observation, seperate to those around it, of a little area of the space in the painter’s view.  These little observations come together eventually and you observe the emergence of a general whole which is made from the particular.  It is this sensation that makes the viewer of these paintings very aware of the artist’s gaze and the power over the model through this gaze.  She is said to be influenced by Giacometti, Lucian Freud and Antonio López Garcia.

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5 Comments »

  1. Ghiper-mega-super-cool!!! x)

    Comment by Nobody — November 19, 2008 @ 1:55 pm | Reply

  2. I studied under Ann. She has a powerful way of examining the figure. Many sessions with her made me look at the human figure under a different kind of light–one where the figure is only part of the space that it sits in–where when you can understand the space–the true figure will show itself to you.

    Plus she is really cool too!

    Comment by castro — December 18, 2008 @ 7:27 pm | Reply

  3. A very inspiring painter, I myself have just recently gotten interested in breaking strokes down, letting edges disappear. Really pleased I found your website, a wealth of information about great painting.

    Comment by Rebecca Harp — October 9, 2009 @ 7:56 am | Reply

  4. that is very beuty

    Comment by mahmoud fawzi — November 23, 2010 @ 9:22 pm | Reply

  5. Love her work.

    Comment by Robert McCall — March 5, 2011 @ 3:59 pm | Reply


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